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What documents can be used as proof of address?

By Lulu Meade

It can be tricky to know which documents you need to keep hold of and which can be thrown out in a Marie Kondo-esque flurry of organisation. Read on to find out which are the important pieces of paper when it comes to proof of address!

When will you need proof of address?

There are a few situations where you might be asked to present proof of where you live, often alongside another form of identification. Most commonly, when you open a new bank account, you’ll often be asked to present proof of address and a photo ID as a security measure. There are only so many options for valid photo ID- normally limited to a passport or driving licence but figuring out the best form of proof of address may be a little less intuitive.

How to get proof of address in the UK?

There may be some variation between banks on what is considered a valid form of ID and whether they’re only willing to accept original copies. Another form of variation is in the validity times (how old a document can be)- make sure to check all these things with your bank!

Here’s a general list of what is accepted as proof of address in the UK:

  • Council tax bill
  • Bank or credit card statement
  • Utility bill
  • Driving licence
  • Mortgage statement or tenancy agreement
  • NHS card

What is a Utility bill?

Utility bills are the cost of products used to run a household. Those most commonly include: electricity bill, gas bill, water bill, phone bill (either mobile or landline) and broadband.

Proof of address letter:

Some institutions will accept a proof of address letter, described below, for those who are new to the UK and as such do not have the usual bills available. There are plenty of templates online that are easy to gap-fill, but essentially it is a letter where a contact or relative is vouching for you, confirming they know you to live at a certain address and enclosing their own details.

How to get proof of address without bills:

As mentioned above, utility bills aren’t the only way to secure a proof of address. Other documentation like a Driving Licence or NHS card are also widely accepted. For those who are new to the UK and don’t have either of those documents either, check out the final section of this post.

What can be proof of address
What if you’re new to the UK?

For those who have just moved to the UK and don’t have any of the above documentation, don’t stress- there are a few ways around proof of address. Again, you’ll want to double-check these options with your bank, but a few common acceptable alternatives are an employment contract or details of your enrolment if you’re in the UK to study (think UCAS details or even a letter from your university or school). Get in touch with your local branch to find out more!

Hopefully, that’s answered your questions on proof of address!

If you are new to the UK, you may want to consider tracking your finances and making sure you stay on track of your bills and financial goals.

That’s why we created Nova, to help millennials who want to improve their financial habits. Nova is the personal finance app that makes saving more compelling than spending because the AI makes it easy to understand habits.

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Whatever the goal, Nova’s got you covered.

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