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How to sell clothes online: 5 Steps to start today

By Lulu Meade

Stuck for ways to make some quick cash? Or maybe you just fancy streamlining your wardrobe? Selling your clothes can be a great way to do both! Check out this post for the top tips on selling your clothes and where to do it.

Step One: Slimlining your wardrobe

If you fancy dabbling with selling your stuff online, the first thing you need to do is figure out what you’re willing to sell. This calls for a clear out, Marie Condo style.

Take everything out of your wardrobe and go through each item one by one, figuring out what you want to keep and what you’re willing to part with. Be honest with yourself, there are only so many items you can save for a special occasion, especially if you’ve already been waiting years to wear that cute skirt. Think about what items you regularly reach for and what items are special to you. Try and get rid of any duplicates you may have and be tough about what you really need!

sell clothes online

Step Two: Organising your clothes

Now you have a pile of clothes you’re ready to sell, check them over to make sure they’re in good nick. Are there any buttons that need to be reattached? Stains that need removing?

You’re obviously going to need to clean everything before you sell but take this time to see if there are any repairs or special attention needed too.

If you’re planning on selling more than one item, you’re going to need to get some good reviews- or at the very least avoid the bad ones. Just because your customer is buying a second hand item that doesn’t mean it can be in bad condition and they are well within their rights to complain if there is anything worse than general wear and tear with their purchases.

Step three: Taking the right photo

Online shopping is great in many ways but has some serious disadvantages too- the main one not being able to see the item in person before you buy, To combat this, and to give yourself the best chance of selling, take the time to take good photos of the items you’re selling.

It’s always good to include a photo of the item on a real person if possible, which can help give styling suggestion and help you customer get an idea of what it looks like on, Make sure your image is well lit and includes multiple angles, including of the label

selling clothes on ebay

Step Four: Setting a price

The final hurdle! Choosing your price doesn’t have to be so difficult, but remember your item has likely depreciated in value since you first bought it. Always look around to see what other similar items are going for and stick to that price range.

Online shoppers generally have the time to shop around and price compare, so don’t get caught out by overcharging!

Where to sell?

There are plenty of choices for platforms to sell through, but here are some of the key info on our top three picks.

Depop

As of May 2020, Depop had over 2 million monthly users, making it one of the most popular platforms. This means plenty of customers (any plenty of competition!). In terms of selling fees, Depop charges 10% of each sale. Also bare in mind that payments are made through Paypal, which comes with its own fees.

Vinted

Vinted is another huge player, which boasts zero sellers fees, but does charge buyers. It tends to cater to a slightly older demographic, and sellers do best sticking to high-street brands

eBay

eBay is the old kid on the block, but certainly shouldn’t be overlooked as a selling platform. Here you have the choice between the ‘Buy it now’ option versus bidding set up, which could be an option to make a bit more cash for those special pieces. eBay charades a 30p listing fee and a 10% selling fee.

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